Global Objectives

Inclusive Agricultural Growth Projects

Inclusive Agricultural Growth

Growth in the agriculture sector has been shown in some areas to be more effective than growth in other sectors at lifting men and women out of poverty — increasing food availability, generating income from production, creating employment and entrepreneurship opportunities throughout value chains, and spurring growth in rural and urban economies. Fruit and vegetable production and markets have a big impact, as these crops generate high economic returns per unit of land. Farmers who grow high-value horticulture crops consistently earn more than those who grow other commodities, allowing smallholder farmers to derive additional income and driving agricultural and economic diversification. Innovation in horticulture crops, including postharvest entrepreneurial opportunities, offer increased production, value-added income, and long-term investment opportunities.

Stengthening the horticulture sector in Guinea Bissau

Led by Erin McGuire ,
The horticulture sector in Guinea Bissau offers significant promise that remains untapped. This project will strengthen input supply, production strategies, and build institutional capacity in higher education, national research, and within farmer groups, primarily groups led by women.

Improved Nutrition Projects

Improved Nutrition

Undernutrition, particularly during the 1,000 days from pregnancy to a child’s second birthday, leads to lower levels of educational attainment, productivity, lifetime earnings, and economic growth rates. Horticulture plays a unique role in ensuring access to and availability of diverse, nutritious food. Increased dietary diversity is highly correlated with better health, and thus reduction of malnutrition and stunting. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is one of the few dietary strategies that can help improve both undernutrition and overnutrition, which can co-exist even in the same household (the so-called "double burden of malnutrition" in transitioning economies).

Promoting food and nutrition security in the West African sub-region through indigenous, neglected and underutilized fruits and vegetables

Led by Dr. Freda E. Asem,
Providing a deeper understanding of the significant role African indigenous fruit and vegetable (AIFVs) have in global food and nutrition security, this project investigates how actors along the value chain can increase income through enhanced production and consumption of and AIFVs in Ghana and Mali.
Ghana, Mali

Resilience Projects

Resilience

Increasingly frequent, intense shocks and stresses threaten the ability of men, women, and families to emerge from poverty in a sustainable way.

Stengthening the horticulture sector in Guinea Bissau

Led by Erin McGuire ,
The horticulture sector in Guinea Bissau offers significant promise that remains untapped. This project will strengthen input supply, production strategies, and build institutional capacity in higher education, national research, and within farmer groups, primarily groups led by women.