Global Objectives

Inclusive Agricultural Growth Projects

Inclusive Agricultural Growth

Growth in the agriculture sector has been shown in some areas to be more effective than growth in other sectors at lifting men and women out of poverty — increasing food availability, generating income from production, creating employment and entrepreneurship opportunities throughout value chains, and spurring growth in rural and urban economies. Fruit and vegetable production and markets have a big impact, as these crops generate high economic returns per unit of land. Farmers who grow high-value horticulture crops consistently earn more than those who grow other commodities, allowing smallholder farmers to derive additional income and driving agricultural and economic diversification. Innovation in horticulture crops, including postharvest entrepreneurial opportunities, offer increased production, value-added income, and long-term investment opportunities.

Empowering women through horticulture in Honduras

Led by Janelle Larson,

In the Western Highlands of Honduras, families struggle to survive on subsistence agriculture. Poverty and malnutrition rates are high, and take a particularly heavy toll on women and children.

Honduras

Scaling up seed-drying technology in Bangladesh

Led by Johan Van Asbrouck,

Providing smallholder farmers access to high-quality seeds of improved varieties of horticultural crops is fundamental to increasing productivity and incomes.

Bangladesh

Managing nematodes and soil health in Guatemala

Led by Brent Sipes,
This research team works with smallholder potato farmers in the Western Highlands of Guatemala on integrated technologies for nematode and soil health management, so potato farmers can achieve sustainable yields.
Guatemala

Improving practices for dried apricots in Tajikistan

Led by Ariana Torres,

Apricots have the potential to be a high-value crop for smallholder farmers in Tajikistan as the climate, soil, and water in many parts of the country are favorable for apricot production.

Tajikistan

Improved Nutrition Projects

Improved Nutrition

Undernutrition, particularly during the 1,000 days from pregnancy to a child’s second birthday, leads to lower levels of educational attainment, productivity, lifetime earnings, and economic growth rates. Horticulture plays a unique role in ensuring access to and availability of diverse, nutritious food. Increased dietary diversity is highly correlated with better health, and thus reduction of malnutrition and stunting. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption is one of the few dietary strategies that can help improve both undernutrition and overnutrition, which can co-exist even in the same household (the so-called "double burden of malnutrition" in transitioning economies).

Investigating integrated vegetable-livestock systems in Cambodia

Led by Jessie Vipham,
The goal of this project is to understand how integrated animal-horticulture systems are most feasible for smallholders by rigorously addressing — through interdisciplinary research — the potential of these systems with regard to sustainable production capacity, income generation, and gender dimensions.
Cambodia

Resilience Projects

Resilience

Increasingly frequent, intense shocks and stresses threaten the ability of men, women, and families to emerge from poverty in a sustainable way.

Reducing postharvest losses in Rwanda

Led by Gurbinder S. Gill,

In 2014, the Rwandan National Horticulture Strategy estimates that 1 million rural households in Rwanda grow horticultural commodities, "principally for home use and sale.

Rwanda

Establishing a horticulture center in Guinea

This project's goal is to introduce novel technologies that will improve production practices and reduce postharvest losses in Guinea. These technologies will be delivered through a market-driven and youth-led Horticulture Training and Services Center in Kindia, Guinea.
Guinea