Inclusive Agricultural Growth

Growth in the agriculture sector has been shown in some areas to be more effective than growth in other sectors at lifting men and women out of poverty — increasing food availability, generating income from production, creating employment and entrepreneurship opportunities throughout value chains, and spurring growth in rural and urban economies. Fruit and vegetable production and markets have a big impact, as these crops generate high economic returns per unit of land. Farmers who grow high-value horticulture crops consistently earn more than those who grow other commodities, allowing smallholder farmers to derive additional income and driving agricultural and economic diversification. Innovation in horticulture crops, including postharvest entrepreneurial opportunities, offer increased production, value-added income, and long-term investment opportunities.

Building postharvest capacity in Tanzania

Led by Eleni Pliakoni,

Postharvest losses of fresh horticultural crops are a major challenge in Tanzania, with studies from Sokoine University of Agriculture estimating losses of fresh produce at 44-60 percent.

Tanzania

Improving tomato production through local GAPs in Nigeria

Led by Sally Miller,

This project enhances regional and international trade in Nigerian tomatoes by developing a science-based good agricultural practices (GAPs) curriculum and training programs to improve production,

Nigeria

Developing a postharvest alternative to fungicide in Sri Lanka

Led by Robert Paull,

This project brings together two parallel research programs for collaboration — one in Sri Lanka using natural coating and herbal extracts and another in Hawaii to use natural epiphytic microorgani

Sri Lanka

Developing a concentrated solar dryer in Tanzania

Led by Diane Barrett,

Women carry out most production of horticultural crops in Tanzania and other developing countries. Harvest periods are short but less than 1% of the crop is processed for off-season consumption.

Tanzania