Phase 1 (Completed)

The Horticulture Innovation Lab's first phase of the program took place between Oct. 1, 2009 and Sept. 30, 2014.

Project

Implementing drying beads for seeds in Asia and Africa

Led by Kent Bradford,

Improving the ability of smallholder farmers to access high-quality seeds of improved varieties of horticultural crops is fundamental to increasing farmer productivity and incomes.

Nepal, Bangladesh, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda

Opening a regional postharvest training center in Tanzania

Led by Diane Barrett,
A year of training for postharvest experts from Tanzania, Rwanda, Kenya, Ghana, Benin and Gabon culminates in the establishment of a model Postharvest and Training Services Center in Tanzania--which the new experts emulate in their home countries.
Tanzania, Rwanda, Ghana, Kenya, Benin, Gabon

Demonstrating nets and floating row covers in Kenya and Benin

Led by William "Vance" Baird,

Rapid urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa has resulted in an increase in demand for food, and fruit and vegetable consumption in the region remains 22-82% below the intake value threshold of 400 g/d

Kenya, Benin

Expanding the floral industry in Honduras

Led by Alan Bennett,

Led by Alan Bennett of UC Davis, this international team supports the ornamental business in Honduras as a means to drive development of a local high-value industry, increase trade, and develop pol

Honduras

Improving tomato production through local GAPs in Nigeria

Led by Sally Miller,

This project enhances regional and international trade in Nigerian tomatoes by developing a science-based good agricultural practices (GAPs) curriculum and training programs to improve production,

Nigeria

Developing a postharvest alternative to fungicide in Sri Lanka

Led by Robert Paull,

This project brings together two parallel research programs for collaboration — one in Sri Lanka using natural coating and herbal extracts and another in Hawaii to use natural epiphytic microorgani

Sri Lanka

Developing a concentrated solar dryer in Tanzania

Led by Diane Barrett,

Women carry out most production of horticultural crops in Tanzania and other developing countries. Harvest periods are short but less than 1% of the crop is processed for off-season consumption.

Tanzania